Tag: Dyslexia

Here’s How to Make Summer Reading Fun For Your Child

Here’s How to Make Summer Reading Fun For Your Child

Takeaway: Try to transform reading into a fun activity rather than a chore your child forces herself to do. This means making it a daily routine, choosing books that explore her interests, and blurring the lines between everyday activities (e.g., TV, cooking, playing, relaxing) and official reading time.    Read More

How Does Dyslexia Affect Primary School Children?

How Does Dyslexia Affect Primary School Children

Takeaway: Dyslexia stems from brain changes that affect your child’s reading, writing, and maths abilities, as well as her physical coordination and learning-related behaviour. But this says nothing about your child’s intelligence and learning potential. So if we diagnose and address your child’s challenges early (in primary school), she can compensate for them and become a skilled learner. Read More

How Dyslexia Can Boost Your Child’s Communication Skills

How Dyslexia Can Boost Your Childs Communication Skills

Takeaway: We usually associate dyslexia with a long list of weaknesses, but this is only half the story. That’s because dyslexia is a brain ‘difference,’ not a brain ‘deficit,’ and it also brings many strengths – especially to do with communication and storytelling. So, as parents, we can help nurture and harness these skills, either at home or with guidance from a specialist.   Read More

Adolescents with ADHD Are Much Better Learners Than We Think!

Adolescents with ADHD Are Much Better Learners Than We Think

Takeaway: We usually think of ADHD in terms of all the troublesome behaviour it can trigger. But there’s depth to the ADHD mind that researchers are only now discovering. Because, rather than stopping adolescents from learning, ADHD simply gives them a different set of needs. So, as parents and facilitators, our job is to recognise and help meet these needs. Read More

Is Your Child Neurodivergent? And What Does That Mean?

Is Your Child Neurodivergent

Takeaway: Neurodivergent children are those who think, feel, or behave differently from their classmates. And rather than seeing these differences as disorders that need to be cured, we should see them as natural brain diversity (i.e., neurodiversity) with its own set of strengths and weaknesses. So, we’re not trying to ‘fix’ a ‘problem’ anymore. Instead, we embrace and develop valuable aspects of a child’s rich, complex mind and personality.   Read More

How to Make Writing Fun: Practical Tips for Children With Dyslexia

How to Make Writing Fun Practical Tips for Children With Dyslexia

Takeaway: With the right system, your child can learn to write without feeling confused and overwhelmed. The trick is to start any writing project with fun creative tasks like brainstorming new ideas or inventing characters to write about. That way, things like sentence structure, spelling, and grammar become just a tiny part of a larger, more exciting process. Read More

Can Children With Dyslexia Become Better Writers?

can children with dyslexia become better writers

Takeaway: Children with dyslexia have strengths they can harness to become better writers. Specifically, they can use emotion and vivid imagery to make writing a more exciting and meaningful process. And they can use simple accommodations to help work around challenges like spelling, grammar, and handwriting. Read More

What Are Visual Processing Difficulties?

What Are Visual Processing Difficulties

Takeaway: Visual processing difficulties have nothing to do with eyesight. Rather, they’re caused by changes in the way your child’s brain processes signals from her eyes. And these changes can make it harder for her to engage with the world. However, with a bit of guidance, she can learn to adapt to her differences, deal with her frustrations better, and become more confident by developing a ‘growth mindset.’ Read More

Dyslexia Vs. Dyscalculia: Differences & Similarities

dyslexia vs dyscalculia

Takeaway: Dyslexia and dyscalculia are separate learning differences, but they have common roots in the brain. So, while dyslexia affects reading skills and dyscalculia affects maths skills, they often overlap. And they both can chip away at your child’s self-confidence if left unchecked. The solution? Teach your child how to adapt to her new learning needs. Read More

How to Talk to Your Child About Her Learning Differences

How to Talk to Your Child About Her Learning Differences

Takeaway: Talking to your child about her learning differences will help her both practically and emotionally. Here’s what to say: (1) Explain what the differences mean, (2) Share age-appropriate information, (3) Highlight her strengths, (4) Discuss key life skills, (5) Teach her to ask for help, and (6) Celebrate other people’s success stories.  Read More